Muscadine Field Day Presentation — Muscadine Cultivars

Dr. Stephen Stringer from the USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory in Poplarville, MS delivered a talk on muscadine cultivars (see photo below).  He even brought some samples for attendees to taste.

Dr. Stringer discussing the best muscadine cultivars for Mississippi.

Dr. Stringer discussing the best muscadine cultivars for Mississippi. Photo courtesy of Dr. Gary Bachman.

Dr. Stringer provided the list and descriptions below:

Muscadine grape cultivars with adaption to the gulf coast region by Dr.  Stephen J. Stringer. 2012.    

Albermarle – disease resistant, medium – high vigor and yield, perfect flowers (self-fertile, good pollinator), early-mid season even ripening, black fruit, dry stem scar, stable pigments.  Used primarily for processing (juice and jelly)

Black Beauty – moderately vigorous and productive, imperfect flowers (female), mid-late ripening  season, l arge purple berry, crisp crunchy skin, excellent flavor, wet stem scar. Primary use is for fresh market, but has poor shelf-life.

Carlos – very vigorous and productive, perfect flowers (pollinator), early – mid season even ripening, small – medium size bronze berries , dry stem scars, good flavor, stable pigments. Widely grown for juice and wine.

Cowart – vigorous and productive, self fertile (pollinator) uneven early- mid season ripening, medium size black berries, wet picking scars, good flavor but tough skin.  Primarily used for juices, jellies.

Darlene – moderately vigorous and productive, female, mid-late season ripening, very large bronze berries, crisp crunchy skin, wet stem scars.  Primarily for fresh market, but has poor shelf life.

Doreen – moderately vigorous and productive, self fertile, late season ripening, med. Bronze berries, wet stem scars, good flavor.  Primarily used for juice and wine.

Fry seedless – moderately vigorous and productive, perfect flowers (poor pollinator), early-mid season ripening, small reddish berries, dry stem scars.  Primarily used for fresh and raisins.

Magnolia – highly vigorous and productive, self fertile (pollinator), mid-season ripening, small bronze berries, wet stem scars.  Used for wine and juice.

Nesbit –vigorous and productive, self fertile (pollinator), mid-late season ripening, medium black berries with very good flavor but tough skin, dry stem scars. Used for pollinator,  fresh market  and jellies.

Noble – vigorous and very productive, self fertile (pollinator), early-mid season even ripening, small black berries with wet stem scars, good flavor, stable pigments.  Widely used for juice and wine.

Pam – vigorous and productive, female, mid season ripening, very large greenish bronze berries, crisp crunchy skin, wet stem scars, very good flavor.  Utilized for fresh market but has poor shelf life.

Pollyanna – vigorous and moderately productive, self fertile (pollinator)  mid- late season ripening, medium size black berries,  dry stem scars, very good flavor.  Uses include fresh and jelly.

Southern Home – Vigorous and productive, self fertile (pollinator), mid-late ripening season, med size black berries, dry stem scars, good flavor.  Uses include fresh market, wines and jelly.  Has unique ornamental leaf shape for landscape.

Summit –vigorous and productive, female, early – mid season ripening, med-large bronze berries, dry stem scars, semi-crunchy skin, good flavor.  Used primarily for fresh market.

Tara – vigorous and moderate productivity, self fertile (pollinator), early –mid season ripening, med – large bronze berries, dry stem scar, good flavor, semi crunchy skin.  Used for fresh and jellies

Triumph – moderately vigorous and productive, self fertile (pollinator), early season ripening, med-large bronze berries, dry stem scar, good flavor, semi-crunchy skin.  Uses include fresh and jellies.

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One response

  1. Pingback: Muscadine raisans | Khnouna

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